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Earthquake Damage, Faults and Seismology

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Aptos

Forest of Nisene Marks State Park: Loma Prieta Epicenter

The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”  

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-Epicenter-003
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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.” 

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-001
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-001

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-002
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-002

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-003
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterExplanation-003

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterMap-001
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterMap-001

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterTrail-001
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterTrail-001

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge."

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterTrail-002
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-EpicenterTrail-002

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-Epicenter-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-29-AptosForest-Epicenter-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. A sign explaining the plate tectonics that ruptured the San Andreas fault and caused the Loma Prieta earthquake is located on a fire road a few miles into the park that is accessible to hikers and bicyclists. Those willing to hike farther, along the Epicenter Trail, can see the sign marking the actual epicenter, at longitude 121.88° W, and latitude 37.03° N. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Forest of Nisene Marks State Park: Twisted Grove

The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-001
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-001

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-002
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-002

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-003
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-003

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-004
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-004

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-005
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-005

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-006
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-006

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-001
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-001

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-002
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-002

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-003
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-003

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-004
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2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGroveTrail-004

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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-AptosForest-TwistedGrove-AllVideo
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The epicenter of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is located within the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park, outside the town of Aptos. The park spans more than 10,000 acres and contains more than 40 miles of hiking trails and fire roads, some of which offer insights into the famous earthquake. Close to the park entrance off Aptos Creek Fire Road is a short hiking trail that leads to “Twisted Grove.” The Loma Prieta earthquake shifted the ground in the forest, which caused the trees in this grove to twist as they grew, as a way of self-correcting. The visitor brochure for the Forest of Nisene Marks State Park says the 1989 earthquake was named after a mountain within the park, whose name, Loma Prieta, translates as “dark hill,” and that three earthquake faults influence the geology of the park: “The San Gregorio Fault runs slightly southeast of park boundaries. The Zayante Fault crosses the park’s Aptos Creek Canyon, while the San Andreas Fault, extending nearly the entire length of the state, parallels the park’s northeastern border below Santa Rosalia Ridge.”

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Berkeley

Bancroft Way

CEA advertising, like at this transit shelter on Bancroft Way near Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley in 2018, has encouraged local residents to prepare for an earthquake that could happen at any time. The Hayward fault, responsible for the 1868 Hayward earthquake that produced violent shaking in parts of the Bay Area, is about a half-mile to the east of where this photo was taken.

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CEA advertising, like at this transit shelter on Bancroft Way near Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley in 2018, has encouraged local residents to prepare for an earthquake that could happen at any time. The Hayward fault, responsible for the 1868 Hayward earthquake that produced violent shaking in parts of the Bay Area, is about a half-mile to the east of where this photo was taken.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 10/17/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


University of California, Berkeley: Memorial Stadium

This view of Berkeley and the San Francisco Bay was taken from the University of California, Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium, which sits atop the Hayward fault. The HayWired Scenario examines what would happen if a hypothetical magnitude 7.0 earthquake were to strike on the Hayward fault in nearby Oakland. Results of this scenario were presented at a media event held at this stadium in 2018.

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This view of Berkeley and the San Francisco Bay was taken from the University of California, Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium, which sits atop the Hayward fault. The HayWired Scenario examines what would happen if a hypothetical magnitude 7.0 earthquake were to strike on the Hayward fault in nearby Oakland. Results of this scenario were presented at a media event held at this stadium in 2018.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 4/18/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Big Pines and Wrightwood

Big Pines

A few miles away from the small town of Wrightwood lies Big Pines, where the remains of Davidson Arch, at 6,864 feet above sea level, mark what is said to be the highest-elevation point along the San Andreas fault. Built in 1926 from local stones, Davidson Arch once served as a pedestrian walkway, but now only its north tower remains. Behind the building is a scarp that marks the fault paralleling State Route 2. The Mountain High ski resort is located across from Davidson Arch.

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A few miles away from the small town of Wrightwood lies Big Pines, where the remains of Davidson Arch, at 6,864 feet above sea level, mark what is said to be the highest-elevation point along the San Andreas fault. Built in 1926 from local stones, Davidson Arch once served as a pedestrian walkway, but now only its north tower remains. Behind the building is a scarp that marks the fault paralleling State Route 2. The Mountain High ski resort is located across from Davidson Arch.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 4/19/2019.

Photo by: Pamela Diaz.


2019-04-19-BigPines-AllVideo
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A few miles away from the small town of Wrightwood lies Big Pines, where the remains of Davidson Arch, at 6,864 feet above sea level, mark what is said to be the highest-elevation point along the San Andreas fault. Built in 1926 from local stones, Davidson Arch once served as a pedestrian walkway, but now only its north tower remains. Behind the building is a scarp that marks the fault paralleling State Route 2. The Mountain High ski resort is located across from Davidson Arch.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 4/19/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Wrightwood

The small town of Wrightwood is located on the San Andreas fault in San Bernardino County. A paleoseismic site near the town has provided evidence of seismic events occurring on the southern San Andreas fault thousands of years ago. And an earthquake with an estimated magnitude of 7.5 that is thought to have had its epicenter near Wrightwood caused 40 deaths at Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1812. Wrightwood is a small town with a small business center and cabin-style homes.

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The small town of Wrightwood is located on the San Andreas fault in San Bernardino County. A paleoseismic site near the town has provided evidence of seismic events occurring on the southern San Andreas fault thousands of years ago. And an earthquake with an estimated magnitude of 7.5 that is thought to have had its epicenter near Wrightwood caused 40 deaths at Mission San Juan Capistrano in 1812. Wrightwood is a small town with a small business center and cabin-style homes.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 4/19/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Desert Hot Springs

Pierson Boulevard

The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Pierson Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, between Palm Drive and Cactus Drive, near the Angel View Resale Store and Casa Blanca restaurant.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Pierson Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, between Palm Drive and Cactus Drive, near the Angel View Resale Store and Casa Blanca restaurant.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Pierson Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, between Palm Drive and Cactus Drive, near the Angel View Resale Store and Casa Blanca restaurant.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Mission Lakes Boulevard

The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Mission Lakes Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, near Rolling Hills Drive.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Mission Lakes Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, near Rolling Hills Drive.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-29-DHS-MissionLakesBoulevard-AllVideo
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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. It crosses Mission Lakes Boulevard to the northwest at approximately this location, near Rolling Hills Drive.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 11/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Indian Canyon Drive

The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County, shown here from Indian Canyon Drive, north of Mission Lakes Boulevard. In these photos, the fault crosses from right to left at the base of these low mountains, heading northwest before then crossing through the larger San Bernardino Mountains, shown with snow at the far left in one of these images.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County, shown here from Indian Canyon Drive, north of Mission Lakes Boulevard. In these photos, the fault crosses from right to left at the base of these low mountains, heading northwest before then crossing through the larger San Bernardino Mountains, shown with snow at the far left in one of these images.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County, shown here from Indian Canyon Drive, north of Mission Lakes Boulevard. In these photos, the fault crosses from right to left at the base of these low mountains, heading northwest before then crossing through the larger San Bernardino Mountains, shown with snow at the far left in one of these images.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-29-DHS-IndianCanyonDrive-AllVideo
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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County, shown here from Indian Canyon Drive, north of Mission Lakes Boulevard. In these photos, the fault crosses from right to left at the base of these low mountains, heading northwest before then crossing through the larger San Bernardino Mountains.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 11/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


State Route 62

The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. The fault crosses State Route 62, at approximately this location, at the town’s northwestern edge, and then passes through the San Bernardino Mountains, shown in the distance with snow. One image also shows Worsley Road, which the fault crosses before State Route 62.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. The fault crosses State Route 62, at approximately this location, at the town’s northwestern edge, and then passes through the San Bernardino Mountains, shown in the distance with snow.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. The fault crosses State Route 62, at approximately this location, at the town’s northwestern edge, and then passes through the San Bernardino Mountains, shown in the distance with snow.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. The fault crosses Worsley Road, at approximately this location, and then State Route 62, at the town’s northwestern edge, and then passes through the San Bernardino Mountains, shown in the distance with snow.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-29-DHS-SR62-AllVideo
Download: 2019-11-29-DHS-SR62-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The San Andreas fault runs through the town of Desert Hot Springs, at the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains in Riverside County. The fault crosses State Route 62, at approximately this location, at the town’s northwestern edge, and then passes through the San Bernardino Mountains, shown in the distance with snow. One video clip also shows Worsley Road, which the fault crosses before State Route 62.

In 1948, a magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck on the San Andreas fault about five miles east of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in communities nearby, such as Palm Springs, as well as in cities farther away, such as Los Angeles and San Diego.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 11/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Fremont

Tule Pond

Tule Pond, off Walnut Avenue in the Bay Area community of Fremont, is a sag pond that fills a depression formed by two strands of the Hayward fault.

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Tule Pond, off Walnut Avenue in the Bay Area community of Fremont, is a sag pond that fills a depression formed by two strands of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Tule Pond, off Walnut Avenue in the Bay Area community of Fremont, is a sag pond that fills a depression formed by two strands of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Tule Pond, off Walnut Avenue in the Bay Area community of Fremont, is a sag pond that fills a depression formed by two strands of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Tule Pond, off Walnut Avenue in the Bay Area community of Fremont, is a sag pond that fills a depression formed by two strands of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Fremont Park: En Echelon Cracks

“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-Fractures-AllVideo
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“En echelon” cracks in pavement and cracked curbs are present where the Hayward fault crosses through Central Park in the Bay Area community of Fremont. Signs marking these cracks and educating passersby about the Hayward fault are now posted in the parking area to the northwest of Sailway Drive within the park.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Fremont Park: Cracked and Offset Curbs

Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-005
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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-006
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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-007
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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-008
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Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Fremont-OffsetCurbs-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

Cracked street curbs and offset sidewalks are present in Fremont’s Central Park, in the Bay Area, where the Hayward fault crosses Sailway Drive. A sign marking these is located on Sailway Drive.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Gallegos Winery Ruins

In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

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In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-002
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2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-002

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Details:

In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-003
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2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-003

Download: 2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-003 | File Type: JPG

Details:

In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-004
Image Preview:

2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-004

Download: 2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-004 | File Type: JPG

Details:

In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-005
Image Preview:

2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-005

Download: 2018-9-13-Fremont-GallegosWinery-005 | File Type: JPG

Details:

In the Bay Area community of Fremont, at the intersection of Osgood Road and Washington Boulevard, lie ruins of the Gallegos winery, which was destroyed by the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The hillside where the winery was built in the 1880s is a scarp of the Hayward fault. Grapes could be loaded from the high ground to make use of gravity in the winemaking process. Modern residences sit atop the fault scarp today, and the ruins below are now the site of a Hayward fault creepmeter.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Hayward

Simon Street

Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-001
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-001

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-002
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-002

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-003
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-003

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-004
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-004

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-005
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-005

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-006
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2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-006

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Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Hayward-SimonStreetScarp-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

Offset sidewalks and curbs, and cracks in pavement and asphalt, appear on both sides of Simon Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward along the scarp of the Hayward fault near the street’s intersection with Prospect Street. The active trace of the fault crosses the street where the curbs show displacement from fault creep, and the slope of the street is scarp of the Hayward fault.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Rose Street

This section of curb on Rose Street, at its intersection with Prospect Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward, once showed significant movement of the Hayward fault, as curb segments moved north and south out of alignment with one another. The curb was repaired as part of a project to install a wheelchair ramp in 2016 but likely will show fault movement again once time has passed.

2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-001
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2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-001

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This section of curb on Rose Street, at its intersection with Prospect Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward, once showed significant movement of the Hayward fault, as curb segments moved north and south out of alignment with one another. The curb was repaired as part of a project to install a wheelchair ramp in 2016 but likely will show fault movement again once time has passed.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-002
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2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-002

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This section of curb on Rose Street, at its intersection with Prospect Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward, once showed significant movement of the Hayward fault, as curb segments moved north and south out of alignment with one another. The curb was repaired as part of a project to install a wheelchair ramp in 2016 but likely will show fault movement again once time has passed.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Hayward-RoseStreetCurb-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

This section of curb on Rose Street, at its intersection with Prospect Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward, once showed significant movement of the Hayward fault, as curb segments moved north and south out of alignment with one another. The curb was repaired as part of a project to install a wheelchair ramp in 2016 but likely will show fault movement again once time has passed.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Prospect Street

A tree grows in the trace of the Hayward fault on Prospect Street, near its intersection with Rose Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward. (Note that the cracks in the sidewalk are likely caused by the tree roots, not necessarily the fault, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.)

2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-001
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2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-001

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A tree grows in the trace of the Hayward fault on Prospect Street, near its intersection with Rose Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward. (Note that the cracks in the sidewalk are likely caused by the tree roots, not necessarily the fault, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.)

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-002
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2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-002

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A tree grows in the trace of the Hayward fault on Prospect Street, near its intersection with Rose Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward. (Note that the cracks in the sidewalk are likely caused by the tree roots, not necessarily the fault, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.)

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Hayward-ProspectStreetTree-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

A tree grows in the trace of the Hayward fault on Prospect Street, near its intersection with Rose Street in the Bay Area community of Hayward. (Note that the cracks in the sidewalk are likely caused by the tree roots, not necessarily the fault, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.)

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


City Hall

The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-001
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-001

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-002
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-002

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-003
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-003

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-004
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-004

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-005
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-005

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-006
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2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-006

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The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Hayward-CityHall-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The old City Hall building on Mission Boulevard between C and D streets in the Bay Area community of Hayward is no longer in use because Hayward fault creep has damaged the building. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, two strands of the fault occur here, one beneath the front of the building and the other behind the building.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Memorial Park

A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-001
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-001

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-002
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-002

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-003
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-003

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-004
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-004

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-005
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-005

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-006
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-006

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-007
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2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-007

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A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/13/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-13-Hayward-MemorialPark-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

A stone wall is offset, and a playground wall and pavement are cracked, by Hayward fault creep where the fault passes through Memorial Park off Mission Boulevard in the Bay Area community of Hayward.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/13/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Hollister

Sixth Street

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-001
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-001

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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-002
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-002

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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-003
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-003

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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-004
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-004

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Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-005
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-005

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Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-006
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-006

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Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-007
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-007

Download: 2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-007 | File Type: JPG

Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-008
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2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-008

Download: 2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-008 | File Type: JPG

Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-29-Hollister-SixthStreet-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Sixth Street, where it caused a low concrete wall and sidewalk to crack and offset a section of curb.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Locust Street

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Locust Street, where the front walk of a house was shifted so that the walk is no longer centered with the porch steps.

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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Locust Street, where the front walk of a house has shifted so that the walk is no longer centered with the porch steps.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Locust Street, where the front walk of a house has shifted so that the walk is no longer centered with the porch steps.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-LocustStreet-AllVideo
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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault. Fault creep from the Calaveras fault is evident throughout the town of Hollister, such as at this location on Locust Street, where the front walk of a house was shifted so that the walk is no longer centered with the porch steps.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Vista Hill Park

The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County, just west of this hilltop park overlooking the town, Vista Hill Park. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault.

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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County, just west of this hilltop park overlooking the town, Vista Hill Park. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County, just west of this hilltop park overlooking the town, Vista Hill Park. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County, just west of this hilltop park overlooking the town, Vista Hill Park. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-Hollister-VistaHillPark-AllVideo
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The Calaveras fault runs through the town of Hollister in San Benito County, just west of this hilltop park overlooking the town, Vista Hill Park. The region surrounding the town has had damage from earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, such as the 1906 San Francisco and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes, as well as from smaller earthquakes on the Calaveras fault, such as the 1979 Coyote Lake and 1874 Morgan Hill earthquakes. Many homes are built on or near the trace of the fault.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Jackson Lake

Jackson Lake

Jackson Lake, located in the Angeles National Forest, a few miles from the town of Wrightwood, is a sag pond that was formed by San Andreas fault activity.

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Jackson Lake, located in the Angeles National Forest, a few miles from the town of Wrightwood, is a sag pond that was formed by San Andreas fault activity.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 4/19/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua Tree National Park

Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” These images were shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-12-2-JoshuaTree-006
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2019-12-2-JoshuaTree-006

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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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 2019-12-2-JoshuaTree-007

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Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” This image was shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 12/2/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-12-2-JoshuaTree-AllVideo
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Details:

Joshua Tree National Park is “crisscrossed with hundreds of faults,” according to National Parks Service brochures, “and a great place to see raw rocks and the effects of earthquakes.” These images were shot in the northwestern part of the park. Prominent faults within Joshua Tree National Park include Blue Cut fault, which runs through the center of the park from east to west. The San Andreas fault lies to the southwest of the park, and the Pinto Mountain fault lies to its northwest. The park also contains several oases caused by earthquake faults. In 1992, the magnitude 6.1 Joshua Tree earthquake struck near the town of Desert Hot Springs and caused damage in the communities of Joshua Tree, Yucca Valley, Desert Hot Springs, Palm Springs and Twentynine Palms. It was considered a foreshock to the even-larger 1992 Landers earthquake, a magnitude 7.3 quake that ruptured in the Mojave Desert two months later and was the state’s largest in 40 years.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 12/1/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Los Angeles

Delmar T. Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge

The Delmar T. Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge, was one of many structures that suffered damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of the college’s campus, and the library’s reinforced-concrete core and steel-frame wings were damaged, with some sections of the library remaining unoccupied for more than six years after the earthquake. Video shows the restored library, and information about the damage the library and its contents sustained is available on the CSU Northridge website.

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The Delmar T. Oviatt Library at California State University, Northridge, was one of many structures that suffered damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of the college’s campus, and the library’s reinforced-concrete core and steel-frame wings were damaged, with some sections of the library remaining unoccupied for more than six years after the earthquake. Video shows the restored library, and information about the damage the library and its contents sustained is available on the CSU Northridge website.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 1/16/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Northridge Fashion Center Macy’s

A Bullock’s store in the Northridge Fashion Center was greatly damaged during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of this shopping center, and eventually the building had to be demolished. Currently, as shown in this video, the restored structure is being occupied by a Macy’s.

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A Bullock’s store in the Northridge Fashion Center was greatly damaged during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of this shopping center, and eventually the building had to be demolished. Currently, as shown in this video, the restored structure is being occupied by a Macy’s.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 1/16/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Parc Ridge Apartments

The Northridge Meadows apartment complex suffered great damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of the 163-unit apartment complex. Sixteen people were killed as a result of the soft-story building's collapse. Parc Ridge Apartments, shown in the video, now sits at the site.

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The Northridge Meadows apartment complex suffered great damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. The magnitude 6.7 earthquake’s epicenter was within a few miles of the 163-unit apartment complex. Sixteen people were killed as a result of the soft-story building's collapse. Parc Ridge Apartments, shown in the video, now sits at the site.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 1/16/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Lauretta Wasserstein Sculpture Garden at California State University, Northridge

Located at California State University, Northridge, the Lauretta Wasserstein Sculpture Garden commemorates the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Artist Margy Sievers, a graduate of the university, used remnants of a campus parking structure that collapsed during the magnitude 6.7 earthquake for a sculptural garden that was completed in 2003.

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Located at California State University, Northridge, the Lauretta Wasserstein Sculpture Garden commemorates the 1994 Northridge earthquake. Artist Margy Sievers, a graduate of the university, used remnants of a campus parking structure that collapsed during the magnitude 6.7 earthquake for a sculptural garden that was completed in 2003.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 1/16/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Lost Lake

Lost Lake

Lost Lake, located in the San Bernardino National Forest, near the Cajon Pass, is a sag pond that was formed by San Andreas fault activity.

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Lost Lake, located in the San Bernardino National Forest, near the Cajon Pass, is a sag pond that was formed by San Andreas fault activity.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 4/19/2019.

Video by: Pamela Diaz.


Millbrae

San Andreas Lake

San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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 2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-006

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


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 2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-007

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-008
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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Highway 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-009
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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-010
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2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-010

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-011
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2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-011

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-012
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2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-012

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San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 2/7/2021.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-AllVideo
Download: 2021-02-07-Millbrae-SALake-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

San Andreas Lake is a sag pond and now a reservoir that lies directly on the San Andreas fault in the Bay Area just outside of Millbrae. A walking path parallels the lake’s eastern shore, along Interstate 280, and offers views of the water. The San Andreas fault reportedly was named after this lake by University of California, Berkeley, geologist Andrew Lawson, who discovered the fault in 1895.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 2/7/2021.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Mission San Juan BaUtista

Mission San Juan Bautista

The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-002
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-002

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-003
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-003

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-004
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-004

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-005
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-005

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-006
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-006

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-007
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-007

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-008
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-EQWalkScarp-008

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-001
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-001

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-002
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-002

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-003
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-003

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-004
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-004

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-005
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-005

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-006
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2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-Establishing-006

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The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/29/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-29-MissionSJBautista-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The Mission San Juan Bautista, established in 1797, sits along the San Andreas fault and has been damaged numerous times by earthquakes, including the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. A plaque on the site commemorates the 100th anniversary of the U.S. Geological Survey and marks the El Camino Real Earthquake Walk, a trail below the mission that is accessible via a staircase descending the escarpment of the San Andreas fault.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/29/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Mission San Juan Capistrano

Mission San Juan Capistrano

Mission San Juan Capistrano suffered damage when a magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck Southern California on Dec. 8, 1812. The quake is believed to have occurred on the San Andreas fault near the present-day town of Wrightwood. Forty attendees of a mass service held at the mission that day, all Native American, died when shaking caused the church to collapse.

2016-05-18-MissionSanJuanCapistrano-001
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Mission San Juan Capistrano suffered damage when a magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck Southern California on Dec. 8, 1812. The quake is believed to have occurred on the San Andreas fault near the present-day town of Wrightwood. Forty attendees of a mass service held at the mission that day, all Native American, died when shaking caused the church to collapse.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/18/2016.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2016-05-18-MissionSanJuanCapistrano-002
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2016-05-18-MissionSanJuanCapistrano-002

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Mission San Juan Capistrano suffered damage when a magnitude 7.5 earthquake struck Southern California on Dec. 8, 1812. The quake is believed to have occurred on the San Andreas fault near the present-day town of Wrightwood. Forty attendees of a mass service held at the mission that day, all Native American, died when shaking caused the church to collapse.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/18/2016.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Palm Springs

San Jacinto Mountains and San Bernardino/Little San Bernardino Mountains

The San Jacinto Mountains provide the western backdrop for the city of Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley. This view, looking southwest from Indian Canyon Drive, shows Chino Canyon, which the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway traverses. The mountain range is a “fault block,” sitting between the San Jacinto fault to its southwest and the San Andreas fault to its northeast and north. The northeastern side of the San Jacinto range, shown here, contains one of the steepest fault escarpments in the United States. The highest peak in the range, San Jacinto Peak, rises 10,834 feet above sea level.

The San Bernardino Mountains and Little San Bernardino Mountains can be seen on the right in one of the images, as well. The San Andreas fault runs along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains before entering the San Bernardino Mountains.

2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacintoMtns-001
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2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacintoMtns-001

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The San Jacinto Mountains provide the western backdrop for the city of Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley. This view, looking southwest from Indian Canyon Drive, shows Chino Canyon, which the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway traverses. The mountain range is a “fault block,” sitting between the San Jacinto fault to its southwest and the San Andreas fault to its northeast and north. The northeastern side of the San Jacinto range, shown here, contains one of the steepest fault escarpments in the United States. The highest peak in the range, San Jacinto Peak, rises 10,834 feet above sea level.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacintoMtns-002
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2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacintoMtns-002

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The San Jacinto Mountains provide the western backdrop for the city of Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley. This view, looking southwest from Indian Canyon Drive, shows Chino Canyon, which the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway traverses. The mountain range is a “fault block,” sitting between the San Jacinto fault to its southwest and the San Andreas fault to its northeast and north. The northeastern side of the San Jacinto range, shown here, contains one of the steepest fault escarpments in the United States. The highest peak in the range, San Jacinto Peak, rises 10,834 feet above sea level.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacinto-SB-LittleSBMtns-001
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2019-11-30-PalmSprings-SanJacinto-SB-LittleSBMtns-001

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The San Jacinto Mountains provide the western backdrop for the city of Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley. This view, looking southwest from Indian Canyon Drive, shows Chino Canyon, which the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway traverses. The mountain range is a “fault block,” sitting between the San Jacinto fault to its southwest and the San Andreas fault to its northeast and north. The northeastern side of the San Jacinto range, shown here, contains one of the steepest fault escarpments in the United States. The highest peak in the range, San Jacinto Peak, rises 10,834 feet above sea level.

The San Bernardino Mountains and Little San Bernardino Mountains can be seen on the right in this image, as well. The San Andreas fault runs along the base of the Little San Bernardino Mountains before entering the San Bernardino Mountains.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


Parkfield

Tectonic Plate Boundary

A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years.

The images here were captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate; from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking north along the fault and creek; from the North American plate, looking toward the Pacific plate; and from the bridge above the San Andreas fault and creek, looking south.

2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-001

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-002

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-003
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-003

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-004
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-NAPlate-004

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-001

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the North American plate, looking toward the Pacific plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-002

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the North American plate, looking toward the Pacific plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-003
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-PacificPlate-003

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the North American plate, looking toward the Pacific plate.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingNorth-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingNorth-001

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking north along the fault and creek.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSouth-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSouth-001

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking south along the fault and creek.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSouth-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSouth-002

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking south along the fault and creek.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSoutheast-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSoutheast-001

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A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking southeast along the fault and creek.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSoutheast-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-SAF-ViewLookingSoutheast-002

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Details:

A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years. This image was captured from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking southeast along the fault and creek.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 5/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-28-Parkfield-Bridge-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

A bridge leading to the town of Parkfield in Monterey County provides several lessons in plate tectonics. The bridge straddles the San Andreas fault (and Cholame Creek) where the North American and Pacific plates meet. Movement of the Pacific plate on the west side of the bridge, while the North American plate on the east side has remained stable, has caused a section of the bridge guard rail to bend slightly over the years.

The images here were captured from the Pacific plate, looking toward the North American plate; from the bridge above the San Andreas fault, looking north along the fault and creek; from the North American plate, looking toward the Pacific plate; and from the bridge above the San Andreas fault and creek, looking south.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/28/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Earthquake Capital of the World

The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-001
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 2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-001

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-002
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 2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-002

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-001

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-002

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-003
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-003

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-004
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-EQCap-004

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The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-EQCap-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-28-Parkfield-Scenic-EQCap-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The tiny town of Parkfield bills itself as the earthquake capital of the world, with a café and lodge prevailing upon visitors to be there and sleep there “when it happens.” Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/28/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


E Clampus Vitus Monument

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-001

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Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-002

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Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-003
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-003

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Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-004
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-004

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Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-005
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-005

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Details: <p>A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.</p>  
<p>Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.</p>
<p>Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.</p>
<p>Photo taken: 05/28/2019.</p>
<p>Photo by: Sarah Sol.</p>
2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-006
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-006

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Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-28-Parkfield-ECVMonument-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

A monument to the San Andreas fault erected by a local chapter of fraternal organization E Clampus Vitus stands in the center of the town of Parkfield and illustrates fault movement.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent, moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/28/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Community Message Board

Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-001
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-001

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Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-002
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-002

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Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-003
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-003

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Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-004
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2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-004

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Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 05/28/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-AllVideo
Download: 2019-05-28-Parkfield-MessageBoard-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

Not many towns have a community message board with information about plate tectonics, but the tiny town of Parkfield does. This message board stands near a U.S. Geological Survey monitoring site and a University of California, Berkeley, Seismological Laboratory unit in Parkfield and answers visitor questions about the San Andreas fault and earthquake risk in the area.

Parkfield experiences fairly frequent low- and moderate-magnitude earthquakes; lies on the San Andreas fault; and is located between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 5/28/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Point Reyes National Seashore

Earthquake Trail

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-001
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 2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-001

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The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-002
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-002

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The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-003
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-003

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The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-004
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-004

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The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-005
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-005

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-006
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-006

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-007
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-007

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The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-008
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 2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-008

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-009
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 2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-009

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-010
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-010

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-011
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-011

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-012
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-012

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-001
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-001

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At this point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-002
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-002

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At this point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-003
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-Fence-003

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-001
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-001

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-002
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-002

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-003
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-003

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-004
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-004

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-005
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-005

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-006
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-006

Download: 2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-006 | File Type: JPG

Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-007
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2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-SAFMarkers-007

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Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 9/14/2018.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-AllVideo
Download: 2018-9-14-PtReyes-EQTrail-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The short Earthquake Trail at the Bear Valley Ranger Station, within the Point Reyes National Seashore, features signs about the San Andreas fault, plate tectonics and the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

The San Andreas fault runs along the trail and is marked by blue posts that dot the hillside.

At one point along the trail, signs mark the location of a wooden fence that broke and “jumped” 16 feet in the Great 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 9/14/2018.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


Salton Sea

Bombay Beach

The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

A couple of images show the lake from a distance.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

2019-11-30-SaltonSea-FromDistance-001
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2019-11-30-SaltonSea-FromDistance-001

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The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, seen from the distance, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SaltonSea-FromDistance-002
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2019-11-30-SaltonSea-FromDistance-002

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The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, seen here from a distance, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Scenic-001
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2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Scenic-001

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The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Scenic-002
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2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Scenic-002

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Details:

The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Sign-001
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2019-11-30-SaltonSea-Sign-001

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Details:

The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SaltonSea-AllVideo
Download: 2019-11-30-SaltonSea-AllVideo | File Type: MP4

Details:

The San Andreas fault begins at the edge of the Salton Sea, in California’s Imperial County. The fault begins near Bombay Beach on the northern shore of the lake, where these images were taken, and trends northwest through the Coachella Valley and beyond into Northern California.

A couple of images show the lake from a distance.

In 2016, a swarm of hundreds of small earthquakes occurred under the Salton Sea, in the Brawley Seismic Zone on cross-faults that are part of a network connecting the San Andreas and Imperial faults. The swarm caused the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services to issue an earthquake advisory about the potential for the small quakes to trigger a larger one on the San Andreas fault.

Video credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Video taken: 11/30/2019.

Video by: Sarah Sol.


San Andreas Springs Oasis

San Andreas Springs Oasis

The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-001
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-001

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-002
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-002

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-003
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-003

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-004
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-004

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-005
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-005

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-006
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-006

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-007
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-007

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-008
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-008

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-009
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-009

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-010
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-010

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Details:

The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-011
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-011

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The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo credit: California Earthquake Authority.

Photo taken: 11/30/2019.

Photo by: Sarah Sol.


2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-012
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2019-11-30-SASpringsOasis-012

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Details:

The San Andreas Springs Oasis within the Dos Palmas Preserve is a unique habitat with dense stands of native palm trees, located a few miles northwest of the Salton Sea in Imperial County. Surface water has been declining here in recent years, and scientists are now evaluating the oasis’ water sources, including those affected by seismic activity. Nearby faults are thought to play a role in the oasis’ water supply, as well as the rate of flow between the San Andreas Springs Oasis and the Dos Palmas Oasis. The San Andreas fault starts at the Salton Sea, and other faults are nearby, as well, including the Hidden Springs fault, Powerline fault, Mecca Hills fault and additional unnamed faults.

A short walking path leads to the oasis from a dirt road known as Sea Breeze Drive, enabling visitors to walk through portions of the oasis.

Photo